Week 25: 52 Week Ancestor 52 Week Blog: Edgar Lawson McKinley

McKinley Edgar Lawson

Right: Edgar Lawson McKinley. Son J.W. McKinley thinks the man on the left is Thad Merritt – the brother-in-law of of Miss Bay McKinley – who was also the second wife of Edgar L. McKinley.

Week 25: June 21, 2014

Edgar “Lawson” McKinley

Edgar Lawson McKinley was born March 7, 1863 in Hancock, Co., Ga. to parents Hugh Lawson and Ann Elizabeth (Dickinson-Dickerson) McKinley.

He first married Rosie Sharp about 1885 in Hancock County, Georgia (daughter of Joseph Thomas Sharp & Narcissa C. Meadows). Rosie was born Nov. 16, 1869 in Taliaferro/Hancock Co., Ga. and died July 8, 1902 in Powelton, Hancock, Co., Georgia; she is buried in Powelton Cem., Powelton, Hancock Co., Georgia.

The 1900 Hancock County shows him living in the 107 th Militia District and married for fifteen years. On page 105, he is listed as a farmer renting land in Hancock County; Edgar never bought land, it was noted he always rented.

Edgar’s father Hugh Lawson (1824-1902) was a twin brother to Joseph Lee McKinley – both born in Mecklenburg County, N.C.

From the marriage to Rosie Sharp, there were eight children: Lena b. 1886, Cora b. 1888, Emma b. 1890, Joseph b. 1892, Edgar (my grandfather) b. 1894, Richard b. 1896, Nevilla b. 1898 and Lonnie b. 1901. Lonnie died the next year and is buried alongside his mother Rosie in Powelton Cem., Hancock, Co., Ga.

EdgarLawsonBoys

Edgar Lawson McKinley and the McKinley boys – Left to Right: Edgar Lawson McKinley (father) Sons: Edgar T., Richard, Earle, Lewis, Walter and J. W. McKinley

He remarried several years later to Nancy Josephine (Minnie) Askew on Dec. 24, 1908. I found it quite amusing when I learned that he married on Christmas Eve – maybe it was busy times and this was a time when work was on hold. Nancy was the daughter of Charlie M. Askew and Cicily Evans; she was born on March 26, 1882 in Hancock Co., Ga. and died on May 4, 1978 in White Plains, Greene Co., Georgia. They are both buried in the White Plains Cemetery, White Plains, Ga. I only knew her as Miss Bay and most called her that; I don’t know why and no one else has ever been able to tell me, but I need to search out an answer. I have an Askew pedigree chart which shows that she is also related to my grandmother Ola Askew McKinley – they are cousins and share grandparents back through the line. My mother always told me they must be related but it seems no one ever really knew how, just assuming from living in the same area and sharing the same last name. This Askew pedigree chart was found in loose papers at the Georgia Archive.

EdgarLawsonfamily

Left: Miss Bay and Edgar Lawson with family. In Front: Aretta and J. W. McKinley. My Grandmother Ola Askew McKinley holding son Leroy McKinley, Walter McKinley next to her. My Grandfather Edgar McKinley in back with hat tilted back on head. Charlie Murrey in back with straw hat (husband of their sister Emma McKinley) Earle McKinley, in back, behind Ola. Most likely it was Emma taking this photo as she was known in the family with her camera and we can “thank her” for many of the early family photos.

His second marriage resulted in five children with Miss Bay; Charles b. 1909, Lewis b. 1913, Walter b. 1915, Aretta b. 1918 and J.W. (James William) b. 1920. (At this writing (2014) there are two living from this second marriage.)

My mother remembers them living just down the road from their log cabin where she was born on Fuller Road. Edgar L. McKinley and Miss Bay lived on Slip Rock Road, it was just “down the road a piece” as mama tells me. Their farmhouse sat on the left side in the small curve on Slip Rock Road – the field still sits vacant now, maybe no one ever wanted to rebuild in this area from the ghost stories. This was the same road that led to the well known local spot “Slip Rock” – the local watering hole for swimming and cooling off; a small running brook (Bruce Creek) ran over several large flat rocks and sloped down into a pool of water. It was quite slippery – you slid very fast right down into that waiting water and it was the clearest water I’ve ever seen. I loved walking through the stream that led to the rocks as you could see your feet in the sandy bottom. It was a place I was able to enjoy as a small child and a teenager, but now it’s all grown up and no longer available to the public. The land was owned by the Lewis family in Siloam at that time and it still may be. They later posted No Trespassing due to people going in and destroying the area and leaving litter.

Edgar and Miss Bay moved to White Plains after he gave up farming and upgraded their house to a more modern farmhouse. I believe the house sat on the back road known as the White Plains-Veazey Road and is still standing today. Miss Bay continued to live there until her death. The old haunted house on Slip Road soon burned and no remnants can be found of it now. The field where it sat, still sits empty. (That might be a good place to venture with my metal detector)

In a previous story, “Siloam Haunting’s on the McKinley farm: Week 14: April 5, 2014” I wrote about a haunting – that house belonged to Edgar Lawson McKinley.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Response to Week 25: 52 Week Ancestor 52 Week Blog: Edgar Lawson McKinley

Lyn Smith says:
January 19, 2015 at 5:42 pm
Edgar Lawson McKinley was my great grandfather, whom I never knew. He died ten years before I was born but I did know my great grandmother, Nancy Josephine Askew McKinley. I’m not sure why my mother called her Miss Minnie but I do remember Papa calling her Miss Bay. Mother said he never knew the reason for the Miss Minnie name but Grandma hated that name – maybe that is why she was called Miss Bay? I wonder if Uncle JW could answer that question?

I remember one of the last times I visited Grandma. It was 1969 when my mother and I went to see her and Aunt Aretta, youngest sister to both my grandfather and Jeanne’s. Aunt Aretta never married and I remember Mother telling me that something was wrong with her eyes and no one could figure out what it was. Mother said Aunt Aretta could read very little and did not go to school. I loved Aunt Aretta and would sit with her going through pictures and talking about each one. Aunt Aretta died a few years ago and I will always miss her.

I remember Papa and Uncle JW had running water put into that house Grandma lived in but Grandma would always wash dishes in a dish pan and toss the water out the back door. That is what she had always done and she couldn’t get out of the habit.

Aunt Ola’s great grandfather, William Milton Askew was Nancy Josephine Askew’s grandfather. William Milton Askew was married twice and from his first marriage to Mary Gerald, was James Brittain Askew, Ola’s grandfather. From William Milton Askew’s second marriage to Ann Green Reid was Charlie Morton Askew, my grandmother, Nancy Josephine’s father.
As of this date, only one of Grandma Josephine’s children are living, Uncle JW, James William McKinley.

Another possible mass of stories could have come from Grandma Josephine but, again, I never thought to ask her. I loved spending time with her but I spent more time with Aunt Aretta. My sister, Mary, spent times with both Grandma and Aunt Aretta as well. When her first son was born, she took him to meet his great-great grandmother. Many pictures were taken and she sent me a few copies. I think the one I treasure the most is of Grandma, Papa, my sister and her son, Richard.

Looking at the second picture Jeanne has posted of the family above, it is amazing to me how much like Aunt Aretta, I looked at that age. A compliment even if I so say so myself.

Family history, the way our elders spent their time when not working include many wonderful stories. My Papa loved baseball and water. I remember as children that Papa would take us on trips to Jekyll Island, Okefenokee Swamp and Indian Springs here in Georgia. All of these places have bodies of water and whenever possible, Papa would take us into the water. I have a picture of Papa, me and my siblings in the ocean. Quite possibly, that is where my love of beaches comes into play. I love walking the beach and hearing the ocean.

I remember one trip we took to Indian Springs on a picnic. They had these water crafts you could rent for fun on the lake. Several of these crafts were rented and Uncle Carroll (my mother’s brother) took me out in the water with him. Uncle Russell, another of Mother’s brothers, took another craft out but I can’t remember who he took with him. Amongst the fun we had, were playing bumper cars with these crafts. I can’t recall what they were called but you had to pedal them, they did not have a motor as those of today. Uncle Russell was the family prankster. A lot of fun was had at every family gathering. My uncles always had a good joke or story to tell, this includes Uncle Charlie. There were four boys and two girls in my mother’s family, mother being the oldest and Uncle Charlie being the next. Of the six siblings, only two remain, Uncle Charlie and the youngest sister, Evelyn.

I loved hearing the stories of their growing up and wish I could remember more of them. I do remember Mother saying she got her love of baseball from her father and brothers. Mother loved her brothers and often bragged of what she learned from them.

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4 Responses to Week 25: 52 Week Ancestor 52 Week Blog: Edgar Lawson McKinley

  1. Pingback: Week 41: October 10, 2014 – 52 Ancestor 52 Week Blog: Rosa L. Sharp (Sharpe) McKinley (1869-1902) | 52 Week Ancestor Challenge

  2. Pingback: Week 44: November 1, 2014 – 52 Ancestor 52 Week Blog: North Caroline McKinley’s settling into Georgia… | 52 Week Ancestor Challenge

  3. Lyn Smith says:

    Edgar Lawson McKinley was my great grandfather, whom I never knew. He died ten years before I was born but I did know my great grandmother, Nancy Josephine Askew McKinley. I’m not sure why my mother called her Miss Minnie but I do remember Papa calling her Miss Bay. Mother said he never knew the reason for the Miss Minnie name but Grandma hated that name – maybe that is why she was called Miss Bay? I wonder if Uncle JW could answer that question?

    I remember one of the last times I visited Grandma. It was 1969 when my mother and I went to see her and Aunt Aretta, youngest sister to both my grandfather and Jeanne’s. Aunt Aretta never married and I remember Mother telling me that something was wrong with her eyes and no one could figure out what it was. Mother said Aunt Aretta could read very little and did not go to school. I loved Aunt Aretta and would sit with her going through pictures and talking about each one. Aunt Aretta died a few years ago and I will always miss her.

    I remember Papa and Uncle JW had running water put into that house Grandma lived in but Grandma would always wash dishes in a dish pan and toss the water out the back door. That is what she had always done and she couldn’t get out of the habit.

    Aunt Ola’s great grandfather, William Milton Askew was Nancy Josephine Askew’s grandfather. William Milton Askew was married twice and from his first marriage to Mary Gerald, was James Brittain Askew, Ola’s grandfather. From William Milton Askew’s second marriage to Ann Green Reid was Charlie Morton Askew, my grandmother, Nancy Josephine’s father.
    As of this date, only one of Grandma Josephine’s children are living, Uncle JW, James William McKinley.

    Another possible mass of stories could have come from Grandma Josephine but, again, I never thought to ask her. I loved spending time with her but I spent more time with Aunt Aretta. My sister, Mary, spent times with both Grandma and Aunt Aretta as well. When her first son was born, she took him to meet his great-great grandmother. Many pictures were taken and she sent me a few copies. I think the one I treasure the most is of Grandma, Papa, my sister and her son, Richard.

    Looking at the second picture Jeanne has posted of the family above, it is amazing to me how much like Aunt Aretta, I looked at that age. A compliment even if I so say so myself.

    Family history, the way our elders spent their time when not working include many wonderful stories. My Papa loved baseball and water. I remember as children that Papa would take us on trips to Jekyll Island, Okefenokee Swamp and Indian Springs here in Georgia. All of these places have bodies of water and whenever possible, Papa would take us into the water. I have a picture of Papa, me and my siblings in the ocean. Quite possibly, that is where my love of beaches comes into play. I love walking the beach and hearing the ocean.

    I remember one trip we took to Indian Springs on a picnic. They had these water crafts you could rent for fun on the lake. Several of these crafts were rented and Uncle Carroll (my mother’s brother) took me out in the water with him. Uncle Russell, another of Mother’s brothers, took another craft out but I can’t remember who he took with him. Amongst the fun we had, were playing bumper cars with these crafts. I can’t recall what they were called but you had to pedal them, they did not have a motor as those of today. Uncle Russell was the family prankster. A lot of fun was had at every family gathering. My uncles always had a good joke or story to tell, this includes Uncle Charlie. There were four boys and two girls in my mother’s family, mother being the oldest and Uncle Charlie being the next. Of the six siblings, only two remain, Uncle Charlie and the youngest sister, Evelyn.

    I loved hearing the stories of their growing up and wish I could remember more of them. I do remember Mother saying she got her love of baseball from her father and brothers. Mother loved her brothers and often bragged of what she learned from them.

  4. Evelyn Smallwood Smith says:

    Jeanne, I was just glancing through your Pinterest and looking at the family picture of our grandparents, the one of your grandmother holding Leroy. All of a sudden I wanted to know how old Papa was, so I looked at Leroy and figured him to be about a year or so, making Papa 15 or 16. Wow. He sure was handsome.

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